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Tuesday, March 14, 2017

TNH Roundtable: Mid-Season Reviews - Supergirl

          With the season now mid-way through, some of the TNH Staff decided to sit down and discuss the shows and our thoughts on each series individually as well as the network's franchise as a whole. What are they doing right and what are they doing wrong? Where have they been and where could they be going? We are going to visit this now, and when the seasons end we are going to come back to re-discuss and compare. For now, check out some of our analysis' and theories in the 3rd of this 9 part series and then let us know what your thoughts were in the comments below.

Please note that due to technical difficulties this and other articles were prevented from being published at their original dates. This article was written February 25th, and only takes account up to episode 2.13; "Mr. and Mrs. Mxyzptlk".

Supergirl


          Supergirl was the show that nobody asked for but has grown on us by doing things that no other show will. Supergirl showcases a slew of characters that dives deep into the alien roster from the likes of Indigo, Jemm, and Martian Manhunter. It shows the world what comic fans already knew, Clark Kent is not the only one who can wear the "Symbol of Hope". The first season, despite a slow start, had been on a steady but narrow uphill climb since launch. This season came with high hopes after news that the show would be moving from CBS to The CW amidst Flashpoint. While those hopes were not entirely met for good as much as poor reason, the show continued to win fans over through the introduction of more fan favorites like Metallo, Parasite, Mon-El and Miss Martian, but both seasons came with as much scrutiny as they did praise. Some characters, as well as plot decisions, didn't go over as well as the showrunners had likely hoped. Character portrayal and plot paths are normal issues, but Supergirl has introduced another problem that came with good intent. Since the very beginning, Feminism and Equality were something Supergirl promoted in its script. However, they initially did so with grace in the first season mostly in part to Calista Flockhart; whereas many have felt these things being force fed in the current season. While new issues have arisen, old issues have been to put to bed, and some issues will always waiver,  the question still stands. Is supergirl on the right track to a successful season?

Supergirl made a network move this season and people are keeping a close eye on the differences between this season with The CW and the last over at CBS. Do you think the move has done them well? Have they made an improvement over the last so far?

Marlon- Absolutely, big time difference. You can just feel the change, and it's for the better. I think the move to The CW really helped.

John- )This season started out great but has recently been on a decline. The loss of Cat Grant (Lockhart) and Maxwell Lord (Peter Facinelli) has been noticeable, but it's not detrimental. I think that it's the writing or the direction that may be the issue.

Witt - Putting aside the fact that the entire show is a carbon copy of the Superman story, I have to say that or all of the CW shows it feels like production budgets have been chopped in half and everything is just feeling written very lazily. I know I am not within the primary demographic for Supergirl, but I do not feel that this is a series that is universally inviting. Supergirl has always had this issue, so it's hard to judge, but when I watch Supergirl I feel like I'm watching a 90's episode of Power Rangers, and not in a good way. Everything feels extremely dumbed down to a child like audience with rudimentary dialogue that feels like it was slapped together after one try. The storylines feel rushed with little effort put into them, and it's all very "by the numbers". It's almost as if the writing staff does a pitch a single pitch and that's what they use. The closest comparison i can draw is the 1990's series, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman. Lazy, campy and integrating very small portions of the comics that are not utilized in the proper context.

It seems that without any explanation they have completely abandoned the idea of rounding up Phantom Zone prisoners....What are thoughts on that?

Marlon- I completely forgot about those prisoners.

Remington- They probably decided it was a plot that was going nowhere and decided to change it.

John- Regardless of their reason, they should have at the very least tied that arc off.

Jack- I think having a fall back plot like this is essential. Perhaps with all of the other arcs this season it became irrelevant and the reason they didn't tie it off is so they can return to it. However, I can recall a couple instances this season where they should have used it instead of pushing romance, but hey, it's The CW.

Which brings up our next topic; Is the romance being pushed too hard? Does Maggie's relationship feel forced, and is Mon-El's potential being put at risk?

John- Maggies gay and there's nothing wrong with that at all, but we don't need to know the in's and out's of everything. I don't need to hear sister talk. They could just show the end of it with Maggie hugging Kara and saying thanks for listening, or just show Maggie on a date. We don't need to know they spent their first night together or any of that. She's Gay!! We know. We're cool with it, move on to a bloody fight scene!

Marlon- Way too many forced relationships, more so than there ever was on CBS.

Witt- Everyone on the show is supposed to be in their early 30's, but they all act like they're in freshman year of high school! The stupid relationship drama drives this series to the point where i feel like only pre-teens girls would be interested in watching this show, so it alienates a massive chunk of your audience. It feels like a Power Rangers show that was written by 12 year olds who think that that is how adults speak and react to situations.

Jack- Kara went through several relationships in the first season, fine, she is the main character. I'd rather see less, but whatever. And while I don't mind other characters having a relationship, We don't need 80% of the showtime focusing on everyone's relationships. They need to remember who they main character is and what she does. We almost had J'onn and M'gann, We got Mon-El and Kara left and right, Maggie and Alex are half the show now, and now we got Winn about to dive into a relationship with an alien. Enough! I thought I was watching Supergirl!! Lastly, I'm worried about the teased arc for Mon-El that shows much potential for the character being dumped to make room for more unnecessary romance.

Is James Olsen still necessary to the show or has he just become a waste of air time?

John- James Olsen is no long a necessary character to the show. Season one, maybe, but now he justs gets in the way. I think the Guardian is necessary, but a new character would have been better. This may be because I've never been a big Superman fan and thought his character was useless in the comics, but the way they wrote it in the show is what matters.

Remington- Waste of air time! I don't like him. Not a bit. Useless. Pointless.

Jack- I truly believe that James Olsen has become a waste of air time. He was necessary for the first season, but he's been written out. The Guardian is also unnecessary. This was their way of giving him a new reason to be in the show by trying to bank on a request for Arrow's John Diggle. The Supergirl show writers have failed this show. Cut him now!

Are they using Martian Manhunter properly? Is he receiving enough screentime? Is it too much?

Remington- They are using him about the same as any of the other heroes. Take what you will from that.

John- MMH is an extremely powerful being and by using him this way they could do it without over-shadowing Supergirl while still having J'onn at full power and potential

Marlon- Showing him a little too much. With all of the other distractions, the little showings are just as bad for the plot. This is Supergirl, not Supergirl and Martian Manhunter.

Witt- If I'm being completely honest, my favorite aspect of the show every since the first season has been J'onn J'onzz, The Martian Manhunter. The episodes that have featured him and focused on his story/backstory have been the best of the series because it has been very loyal to the source material.

What does Supergirl need to do in the future to ensure a successful second season, and what can they take with them to future seasons?

John- I think a major issue this season has been the significantly lower quality villains compared to last. We need to see a really powerful villain that Kara can't take down without help.

Remington- They need to keep it up with the Superman arcs., even a cameo or two. They are fun, and she grows as a hero, and as a person, more than usual.

Jack- Less romance. Less unnecessary characters and plots. More Appearances. Easy on the propaganda. Test Supergirl with each episode and have her grow. Enough with every episode trying to emphasize girl power by her yelling at people that she doesn't need their help. Show us! Show us you don't need their help! Learn that you do because everyone needs help. Don't just act like MHM didn't swoop in and save you. More through action rather than now repetitive dialogue. Doing is far more effective than telling.

          So as it turns out, while Supergirl has replaced some old issues with some new, they are still on the right track. However, that train they are riding is shaky. They need to really take care of these issues before they snowball. Small fixes. Keep up what's working and ditch what's not, and it should be a successful season in the end. Here's to "Hoping".

Stay Tuned for our next installment of this Roundtable Review series where we give our thoughts on The Flash.

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Written and Edited by, Jack Flowers. Edited by, Trey Griffith. Contributions from Marlon Ortega, John Ayre, Witt Reese, Remington Keyes.

This article was Sponsored by  Outright Geekery.

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